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LGBTQ Families Day

Celebrate LGBTQ Families Day!

Monday, June 3, 2024, is the 19th Annual LGBTQ Families Day, a time to celebrate the many families with LGBTQ people in them who live in every state and almost every county of the U.S. The event aims to raise awareness of the diversity, joys, and challenges of all LGBTQ families—found, formed, and chosen—who exist throughout our society.

How to Participate

Anyone who supports LGBTQ families is welcome to participate by:

  • Posting or sharing on any social media channel on June 3, 2024, in celebration and support of LGBTQ families. Include the hashtag #LGBTQFamiliesDay. Ideas include a family photo/video, family anecdote, image of an LGBTQ-inclusive kids’ book, or a simple message of support.
  • Following the hashtag #LGBTQFamiliesDay throughout the day and sharing the stories, images, and thoughts from other participants.
  • Celebrating in your community in whatever way uplifts the voices and experiences of LGBTQ families.

Background

LGBTQ Families Day was developed by the award-winning LGBTQ parenting site Mombian and is sponsored by Family Equality, PFLAG National, GLAAD, GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD), and COLAGE. Additional partners include Gays With Kids, OurShelves, PregnantTogether, and the Queer Family Podcast. Since 2006 (originally as Blogging for LGBTQ Families Day), the day has engaged parents across the LGBTQ spectrum, parents of LGBTQ children, LGBTQ individuals, children of LGBTQ parents, and non-LGBTQ family members and allies. The event is held on the first weekday of June, between Mother’s Day and Father’s Day, in order to honor all parents but also to highlight that not all families fit into the traditional structure of one mother and one father. Additionally, June is LGBTQ Pride Month.

Learn More

Images

(Click images to show full size. You can then save them for sharing—or use an image or video of your own family or a message of support.)

LGBTQ Families Day: June 3, 2024. #LGBTQFamiliesDay. Logos for Family Equality, Mombian, COLAGE, GLAAD, GLAD, and PFLAG.
LGBTQ Families Day: June 3, 2024. #LGBTQFamiliesDay. Logos for Family Equality, Mombian, COLAGE, GLAAD, GLAD, and PFLAG.

News

Celebrate LGBTQ Families Day on June 3, 2024

Mombian, Family Equality, GLAAD, GLAD, PFLAG National, and COLAGE Join Forces to Elevate Stories of LGBTQ Families

Monday, June 3, 2024, is the 19th Annual LGBTQ Families Day, a time to celebrate the many families with LGBTQ people in them who live in every state and almost every county of the U.S. The event aims to raise awareness of the diversity, joys, and challenges of all LGBTQ families—found, formed, and chosen—who exist throughout our society.

Anyone is welcome to participate by:

  • Posting or sharing on any social media channel on June 3, 2024, in celebration and support of LGBTQ families. Include the hashtag #LGBTQFamiliesDay. Ideas include a family photo/video, family anecdote, image of an LGBTQ-inclusive kids’ book, or a simple message of support.
  • Following the hashtag #LGBTQFamiliesDay throughout the day and sharing the stories, images, and thoughts from other participants.
  • Celebrating in your community in whatever way uplifts the voices and experiences of LGBTQ families.

LGBTQ Families Day was developed by the award-winning LGBTQ parenting site Mombian and is sponsored by Family Equality, PFLAG National, GLAAD, GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD), and COLAGE. Additional partners include Gays With Kids, OurShelves, PregnantTogether, and the Queer Family Podcast. Since 2006 (originally as Blogging for LGBTQ Families Day), the day has engaged parents across the LGBTQ spectrum, parents of LGBTQ children, LGBTQ individuals, children of LGBTQ parents, and non-LGBTQ family members and allies. The event is held on the first weekday of June, between Mother’s Day and Father’s Day, in order to honor all parents but also to highlight that not all families fit into the traditional structure of one mother and one father. Additionally, June is LGBTQ Pride Month.

“LGBTQ Families Day is a time to show our strength as a community, to elevate our collective stories, and for allies to reaffirm their support,” said Dana Rudolph, Founder and Publisher of Mombian. “Our families are diverse in many ways, but united in our desire to raise our children in equitable, supportive environments where they can thrive.”

“For nearly two decades, Family Equality has had the pleasure of partnering with Mombian for LGBTQ Families Day, and this year, it’s particularly important for us to celebrate our joy and our hope,” said Jaymes Black, CEO of Family Equality. “My hope for a bright future is fueled by the aspirations and stories of LGBTQ+ families across the U.S. Their stories are of resilience and love. In spite of the anti-LGBTQ+ legislation and rhetoric, our families continue to exist, continue to love, and continue to hope. We exist and we won’t be erased. Let’s celebrate the joy of our families on LGBTQ Families Day and every day.”

“When anti-LGBTQ extremists spread harmful misinformation on LGBTQ families—whether it be the baseless claim that LGBTQ adults are groomers, or the so-called dangers of medical care for trans youth—the necessary stories of happy and healthy LGBTQ families prevail over the false narratives. LGBTQ Families Day reinforces that such hateful voices are truly a minority in this country, and that a supermajority of Americans supports equality for LGBTQ people. Queer families deserve to be celebrated and protected, today and always,” said Sarah Kate Ellis, President and CEO of GLAAD.

“Everywhere you go, LGBTQ families are part of the fabric of our communities, defending our country and making our homes, schools, places of worship, workplaces, and neighborhoods vibrant with love. Join us on LGBTQ Families Day to celebrate and elevate our families—to share joy and hope and to celebrate the many ways love makes a family,” said Brian K. Bond (he/him), CEO of PFLAG National.

“LGBTQ Families Day is about sharing the beauty, resilience. and joy of our diverse family stories,” said Polly Crozier, Director of Family Advocacy at GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD). “As we work alongside families and allies across the country to resist anti-LGBTQ+ attacks and to strengthen legal protections and security, we’re grateful to Mombian for creating space to honor that LGBTQ+ people are an integral part of every community and to celebrate the many wonderful ways our families come to be.”

“We are thrilled to again join Mombian in celebrating LGBTQ Families Day!” said Jordan Budd, Executive Director of COLAGE, the only national organization for people with LGBTQ+ parents or caregivers. “While the attacks on our community, our families, and our bodily autonomy have not stopped, our families are as strong and resilient as ever. Today we celebrate the love and joy that binds our families together, and the special place we hold as the children of queer parents as we advocate for the safety and security of our community.”

About the Organizer and Sponsors

The two-time GLAAD Media Award-winning blog Mombian offers a daily mix of news, insights, and resources for lesbian moms and other LGBTQ parents, including a searchable database of 1,500+ LGBTQ family books. The site was founded in 2005 by Dana Rudolph, a journalist and lesbian mom who also pens a regular “Mombian” column for several LGBTQ newspapers. In 2018, she received the Hostetter-Habib Family Award from Family Equality.

Family Equality advances legal and lived equality for LGBTQ+ families, and for those who wish to form them, through building community, changing hearts and minds, and driving policy change. Family Equality believes every LGBTQ+ person should have the right and opportunity to form and sustain a loving family, regardless of who they are or where they live.

PFLAG is an organization of LGBTQ+ people, parents, families, and allies who work together to create an equitable and inclusive world. We are hundreds of thousands of people and hundreds of chapters from coast to coast who are leading with love to support families, educate allies, and advocate for just, equitable, and inclusive legislation and policies. Since our founding in 1973, PFLAG works every day to ensure LGBTQ+ people everywhere are safe, celebrated, empowered and loved. Learn more, find support, donate, and take action at PFLAG.org.

GLAAD rewrites the script for LGBTQ acceptance. As a dynamic media force, GLAAD tackles tough issues to shape the narrative and provoke dialogue that leads to cultural change. GLAAD protects all that has been accomplished and creates a world where everyone can live the life they love. To learn more about taking action for LGBTQ people and issues, go to www.glaad.org/VOTE.

Through strategic litigation, public policy advocacy, and education, GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) works in New England and nationally to create a just society free of discrimination based on gender identity and expression, HIV status, and sexual orientation.

COLAGE unites people with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer parents into a network of peers and supports them as they nurture and empower each other to be skilled, self-confident, and just leaders in our collective communities.

Images

(Click images to show full size. You can then save them for sharing—or use an image or video of your own family or a message of support.)

LGBTQ Families Day: June 3, 2024. #LGBTQFamiliesDay. Logos for Family Equality, Mombian, COLAGE, GLAAD, GLAD, and PFLAG.
LGBTQ Families Day: June 3, 2024. #LGBTQFamiliesDay. Logos for Family Equality, Mombian, COLAGE, GLAAD, GLAD, and PFLAG.

Title IX | National

In April of 2024, the U.S. Department of Education released a final rule that affirms that Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, transgender status, and other sex-based characteristics and stereotypes.

This is a clear statement that federal law protects LGBTQ+ students from discrimination in public schools and that the Office of Civil Rights will investigate complaints.

The rule also reinstates broad protections and remedies for students who experience sex-based harassment, removing onerous complaint resolution procedures instituted by the prior administration, and providing much-needed updates regarding the rights of pregnant and parenting students.

Q&A

What does this new rule mean for my school?

The federal Department of Education has instructed all schools that receive federal funding to update or adopt policies that comply with these Title IX regulations.

When must my school/university implement the new Title IX regulations?

New Title IX regulations must be adopted by August 1, 2024

Who is better protected by the new regulations?

The final regulations provide greater clarity regarding: the definition of “sex-based harassment”; the scope of sex discrimination, including schools’ obligations not to discriminate based on sex stereotypes, sex characteristics, pregnancy or related conditions, sexual orientation, and gender identity; and schools’ obligations to provide an educational environment free from discrimination on the basis of sex (including LGBTQ+ students).

Does Title IX protect me as an LGBTQ+ student?

Yes! The rule prohibits discrimination and harassment based on sexual orientation, gender identity, and sex characteristics in federally funded education programs. The rule applies the reasoning of the Supreme Court’s ruling in Bostock v. Clayton County that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or transgender status is discrimination because of sex.

This means that schools must protect LGBTQ students from harassment and discrimination and cannot treat LGBTQ students differently from other students, including in sex-separated facilities – like access to bathrooms and locker rooms – and school programs.

Does the ruling say anything about transgender athletes?

The final regulations do not include specific language about sports.

However, several courts have said that banning all transgender girls from playing on girls’ sports teams or all transgender boys from playing on boys’ sports teams violates Title IX.

Are there exceptions to what Title IX covers?

Yes, there are some exceptions.

However, no one can be denied the benefits of the new regulations from educational institutions receiving federal financial assistance.

You can find further information regarding exemptions here.

State Laws and How to Get Help

  • It is important to note that in New England state laws also provide protections, sometimes greater than those at the federal level, and are often the first place to start when looking for support
    • You can find state-specific resources for dealing with bullying and harassment due to LGBTQ+ status or perceived status at schools here
  • If you have exhausted state-based resources or want to learn more about your rights under Title IX, you can find Title IX-specific information and resources here as well as the US Department of Education’s 2024 Ruling Fact Sheet here, where much of the information above has been pulled from
  • If you need more information or have questions about what to do if you or your child is experiencing discrimination, bullying, or harassment at school, contact GLAD Answers

A Note About Lawsuits Challenging the New Title IX Regulations

Some states that have passed anti-LGBTQ laws in recent years are currently challenging the new Title IX regulations in court.  However, no court rulings have yet been issued. Schools should be prepared to implement the new regulations by August 1, 2024.

Blog

Combating Censorship in Education

In December 2023, a police officer showed up to search a Great Barrington, Massachusetts, middle school classroom and questioned a teacher over reports of the presence of an LGBTQ+ book: Gender Queer, by Maia Kobabe. Even at a time of widespread attempts to ban books across the country, it was shocking to learn that the police had been called – and responded – based on the fear that a book (an award-winning, coming-of-age memoir from a nonbinary author) might be found in a classroom bookshelf for older teens in Massachusetts.

Four teens - one white girl, two black girls, and one black boy - all gathered around a book in a library.

GLAD quickly weighed in with our partner, the ACLU of Massachusetts, condemning this unwarranted and inappropriate intrusion into the classroom. In a letter to the Berkshire County District Attorney and Great Barrington Chief of Police, we made our message clear: law enforcement has no place policing educational material. The letter also underscored the importance of protecting the constitutional right to learn free of censorship.

School districts have established ways for parents and caretakers to challenge books, so they can be reviewed in a less contentious and more objective way. Calling the police to search classrooms and identify students who have requested books is not part of that procedure.

The attempted censoring of Gender Queer is far from an isolated incident. Pressure campaigns to ban books have popped up in state legislatures and school communities around the country, and this coordinated attack is not just on LGBTQ+ representation. According to the American Library Association (ALA), many of the eleven most challenged books of 2023 were by authors of color. Nine of the eleven titles were from Black, Indigenous, and other people of color, LGBTQ+ people, or people with multiple marginalized identities.

School libraries are the most accessible place for young people to find books where they can learn about themselves and the world – something that can be especially true in rural areas.  As one of the authors who was on the 2022 ALA challenged book list, Ashley Hope Perez, told the Dallas Morning News, “Out of Darkness [the story of a Mexican American girl and an African American boy’s love affair in 1930s Texas] was removed from the district’s high school library shelves, and now, students can read it only by request, with parent permission. As an English teacher and mother, I know that if teens can’t find a book on the shelves, they likely will never read it. This loss of access undermines the efforts of librarians and teachers to support students’ right to education and full literacy.”

Last fall, together with Lambda Legal and NCLR, we filed an amicus brief in Mahmoud v. McKnight, pending in the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. We shared our perspective and expertise in support of a Maryland school district that introduced storybooks with LGBTQ+ characters into the language arts curriculum. Our brief, filed on behalf of parents, students, educators, civil rights advocates, and health care and suicide prevention service providers, provided evidence of an inclusive curriculum’s importance in creating a welcoming, respectful school climate for all students. Such climates are especially important for LGBTQ+ students, students of color, and others who face a heightened risk of bullying. And positive school climates create better educational outcomes for all students.

Polly Crozier (grey suit), Shaplaie Brooks (far right), and Carmen Paulino (yellow shirt).
GLAD Director of Family Advocacy Polly Crozier with other youth advocates Shaplaie Brooks, Carmen Paulino.

Despite robust nondiscrimination protections in certain states, politicians and conservative groups have been actively working to undermine public education to exclude LGBTQ+ people, thereby threatening the rights of all students. This climate of hostility has permeated communities across the country, including within progressive-leaning states. Over the past two years, GLAD and the ACLU have been compelled to notify school districts across Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine of the constitutional prohibition on viewpoint discrimination, to ensure all students have the right to access reading materials. Students must be allowed to engage with reading material that reflects their life experiences and the experiences of others. School personnel must resist the alarming surge of attempted book bans.

We can’t know why the staff person who called the police in Great Barrington, MA, took that step. They may have acted out of fear or been emboldened by the lengths to which other areas of the country are going to remove LGBTQ+ people and families from classroom discussions and libraries.

For whatever reasons, censorship attempts like this will continue to arise, but they also spark conversations about the importance of diverse representation in our schools. By standing firm in our commitment to uphold the constitutional right to learn free of censorship, we send a powerful message: that every student deserves access to literature that reflects their identities and experiences. By remaining vigilant and unwavering in our dedication to equality, we can create a future where all young people feel seen, valued, and empowered to learn and grow.

Good News!

On April 19, the Biden Administration released final Title IX rules affirming nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ+ students. GLAD and our partner organizations look forward to working with schools and school districts to ensure policies and practices comply with federal law before the August 1 deadline.


Pride at School | National

Public schools have a responsibility to support and provide a positive environment for all students.

One way that they do this is by displaying support for LGBTQ+ students through Pride symbols and flags.

Public school administrators are legally required to provide the same rights to all students and student clubs under the Equal Access Act. So, for example, if the school allows students from other clubs to hang flags or banners, the school has a legal responsibility to allow their GSA (Gender and Sexuality Alliance) to do the same.

At schools, school officials are able to create guidelines around displaying supportive flags and symbols. Just because they display supportive imagery does not mean that they also need to display offensive imagery if requested to do so. Schools do not need to worry about being forced to put up offensive banners, decorations, or other imagery.

This means schools can fly flags like the Black Lives Matter or Transgender Pride flags to show support for their students. Schools do NOT have to take down these flags, even if someone requests it as a hostile symbol.

What can schools do?

  • Keep up existing inclusive flags, signs, and posters.
  • Have school faculty meetings where school employees propose new inclusive displays.
  • Put up new inclusive displays to show support for their students.
  • Provide all student clubs with the same resources.

What should schools not do?

  • Schools should not create programs that allow private individuals to propose flag suggestions.
  • Schools should not let non-school employees put up displays.
  • Schools cannot allow only some groups of students to have clubs and exclude others.

College | National

Every student is entitled to equal educational opportunities and an environment that supports them. They also deserve to show up as and express their authentic selves, which includes having their proper name and pronouns used in classroom and administrative settings. For LGBTQ+ college students, this can prove difficult as there are no overarching policies or laws regarding name and pronoun usage at universities. Public universities often have more protections for LGBTQ+ students whereas private and religious educational institutions may follow different policies. Below you can find some information on best practices and ideas on how to best approach the subject with staff, professors, and administration. The links and resources provided were not compiled by GLAD and have not been vetted by GLAD.

Applying to LGBTQ+ Friendly Universities

Name & Pronoun Use and the Common App

Due to the Common App (a platform that allows students to use one college application to apply to several universities) asking students for their (preferred) names and pronouns, as of January 2022 over 900 universities across the US now have the ability to integrate the use of those names and pronouns, and over 200 universities directly use this information in their campus information systems.

Here you can find a list from August 2023 of The Best Colleges for LGBTQ+ Students in the US. You can also use the Campus Pride Index.

Pronoun and Name Usage on Campus

Professors using your correct name and pronouns:

All students deserve to be treated with respect. One way professors can be respectful is by asking for and using students’ correct name and pronouns (even if they differ from what’s on the students’ records).

If you are being named incorrectly and misgendered here are some steps you can take to advocate for yourself:

  • Bring it up to the person misgendering or misnaming you. They may not be aware that they are doing so and might be able/willing to easily change this.
  • Share resources. You can find GLSEN’s Pronouns Guide here.
  • Start a conversation on campus and advocate for campus-wide change. Connect with Campus Pride to take their trainings and use their LGBTQ+ advocacy resources.
  • Go to the Title IX Office. Persistent, intentional misgendering is also something you can raise with the Title IX Office at your university.

Updating your preferred name and pronouns with the registrar’s office:

Some universities now give students the ability to update their name and pronoun information at the registrars’ office so as to not out trans students to their professors and other campus staff. Check out this example of a policy to update for preferred (not legal) names and pronouns from Berklee College of Music.

If your school does not have such a policy and/or is refusing to allow you to update your name and pronouns through the registrar’s office, you may be able to make a Title IX complaint. Title IX protects LGBTQ+ students from discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Read more about Title IX here.

Because of FERPA protections, if you are over 18, by law you are able to update your name and pronouns at your college without that information being shared with your parents, guardians, spouse, or financial benefactors.

Advocating for correct name and pronoun usage on campus:

Campus Pride has great advocacy trainings and resources for students.

University Policies, Best Practices, Etc.

Guides for universities looking to update their practices

Below, university administration, professors, and staff can find guides on supporting LGBTQ+ students in higher education:

GLAD Answers

If you’ve followed these steps and the situation has not resolved or is getting worse, please reach out to GLAD Answers. Complete the online intake form at GLADAnswers.org, email GLADAnswers@glad.org, or leave a voicemail at 800-455-GLAD.

Blog

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month 2024

Happy Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Heritage Month! Join us in celebrating the lasting impact of AANHPI LGBTQ+ advocates, artists, and athletes.

Esera Tuaolo (he/him)

Profile picture of Esera Tuaolo

Esera Tuaolo holds a multifaceted background as a former NFL football player and an advocate for LGBTQ+ rights. His journey gained public attention in 2003 when he came out as gay, defying the entrenched hyper-masculine culture prevalent in professional football. Despite facing the weight of societal expectations, Tuaolo navigated through immense challenges, including pressures to conceal his sexuality, bouts of depression, and struggles with alcoholism.  

Tuaolo actively engages in public discourse on inclusion, diversity, and the persistence of homophobia. In his role as Executive Director of Hate Is Wrong, a nonprofit organization committed to fostering diversity in sports and combating bullying among youth, he leverages his platform and lived experiences to enact tangible change, striving to create a world where everyone, regardless of sexual orientation or identity, can thrive. 

Hayley Kiyoko (she/her)

Profile picture of Hayley Kiyoko

Hayley Kiyoko is a singer, songwriter, actress, dancer, and director. She identifies as a multiracial white and Japanese lesbian. Kiyoko works towards inspiring confidence in young people that struggle with being queer and normalizing lesbian relationships in mainstream music. More recently, she has been outspoken about mental health, chronic stress, and the importance of conversations about the connections between mental and physical health. 

Ifti Nasim (he/him)

Profile picture of Ifti Nasim

Ifti Nasim was a gay Pakistani American poet, writer, broadcaster, and activist. When he was 16, Nasim was shot after reading a poem at a protest against martial law. Nasim went on to co-found Chicago Sangat, an organization to support the LGBTQ+ South Asian community, and was inducted into the Chicago Gay and Lesbian Hall of Fame in 1996. Since he died in 2011, Nasim has been celebrated for his activism against war, HIV, social injustice, and homophobia in his native Pakistan and other Muslim nations. 

Vikram Seth (he/him)

Profile Picture of Vikram Seth

Vikram Seth is a bisexual Indian novelist and poet. He has written several novels and poetry books including A Suitable Boy, which has received numerous awards and was adapted as a limited series released in 2020. Seth has spoken on behalf of the LGBTQ+ community, including writing a poem called “Through Love’s Great Power” in reaction to the criminalization of gay sex in India. 

Kit Yan (they/he/she)

Profile picture of Kit Yan

Kit Yan is known for their significant contributions as a queer, transgender, Asian-American artist and activist. Their journey through spoken word poetry and performance art has not only garnered acclaim but also served as a powerful platform for advocating LGBTQ+ rights and visibility. Kit’s latest project “Interstate,” co-created with Melissa Li, is a musical with trans and queer Asian American leads who go on a road trip/tour while also navigating love, gender, and finding community. 

Siu Fung Law (they/them)

Profile picture of Siu Fung Law

Siu Fung Law has dedicated their efforts to promoting inclusivity within athletic spaces and breaking down barriers. Law’s journey gained recognition when they became the world’s first nonbinary professional bodybuilder. 

Law uses their platform to discuss topics such as gender diversity, LGBTQ+ rights, and the intersection of identity and sports. Their engaging talks inspire audiences to embrace authenticity and foster environments of acceptance. 

Utada Hikaru (she/they)

Profile picture of Utada Hikaru

Utada Hikaru, known affectionately as “Hikki” by fans, is a nonbinary Japanese and American singer-songwriter. Their soulful melodies and introspective lyrics have earned them global acclaim ever since their debut 1999 album, First Love, which she released in 1999 at 16 years old. The album is still the bestselling album in Japanese history. while their advocacy for gender equity, LGBTQI+ rights, and racial equality amplifies their impact beyond music. Fearlessly exploring themes of identity and societal norms, Hikaru encourages listeners to embrace authenticity and challenge stereotypes. Their most recent album, BAD MODE, is the first since coming out as nonbinary. Their inspiration for the album draws from the challenges of COVID lockdown, mental health, and RuPaul’s Drag Race

News

GLAD Commends Robust Health Care Nondiscrimination Protections in New Health and Human Services Rule 

On Friday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a final rule that clarifies and reaffirms that Section 1557, the nondiscrimination provision of the Affordable Care Act, protects LGBTQ+ people in access to health care services and health insurance. 

Section 1557 “prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability in any health program or activity that receives Federal financial assistance, State-based health insurance Exchanges, and HHS health programs and activities” (from the HHS 1557 fact sheet).  The new rule both reinstates and expands on regulations issued under the Obama Administration clarifying that the prohibition against discrimination based on sex includes gender identity and sexual orientation, and brings the rule in line with the 2020 Supreme Court Bostock decision. 

The new rule also reinstates strong language access provisions requiring availability, training, and notification of translation services for 15 languages, and provides explicit protections from discrimination in telehealth and in the use of AI and machine learning in health care decision making tools. 

“Ensuring nondiscrimination in medical care is key to positive health outcomes. That’s important for people who need care, but it’s also essential for communities to thrive,” said Jennifer Levi, GLAD Senior Director of Transgender and Queer Rights. “At a time when politicians are banning essential transgender and reproductive health care, and as inequities in access to care persist for LGBTQ+ people, people of color, women, older adults, and people for whom English is not their first language, we commend the Department of Health and Human Services for affirming robust federal protections to ensure people can access the care they need and to support stronger, healthier communities.”

The rule applies to health care services including receiving medical care in doctors’ offices, hospitals or other settings, to all issuers of health insurance that receive Federal financial assistance and to all HHS programs including the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the National Institutes of Health, and the Indian Health Service. For the first time the rule treats Medicare Part B as federal financial assistance.

The rule goes into effect in 60 days after publication in the federal register which is expected on May 6. 

News

GLAD and NCLR Commend Biden Administration for New Rules Implementing Essential Nondiscrimination Protections in Education

Today, the U.S. Department of Education issued a final rule interpreting and enforcing Title IX, restoring and reinforcing vital civil rights protections for LGBTQ+ students. The National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR) and GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) applaud the Department’s affirmation that Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, transgender status and other sex-based characteristics and stereotypes. The organizations also commend the administration for reinstating broad protections and remedies for students who experience sex-based harassment, removing the onerous complaint resolution procedures instituted by the prior administration, and providing much-needed updates regarding the rights of pregnant and parenting students.

Statement from Julianna Gonen, NCLR’s Federal Policy Director:

“Today the U. S. Department of Education has enshrined in federal regulation what we all know to be true – discrimination against students on the basis of sex has no place in our schools. In this time when policymakers in some states are targeting LGBTQ – and particularly transgender – youth with hostile laws, it is essential for our federal government to send a clear message that such measures violate federal law. We welcome these updated Title IX rules and look forward to working with the Biden Administration to ensure that they are fully implemented so that all students can learn and thrive in our public schools.”

Statement from Jennifer Levi, GLAD Senior Director of Transgender and Queer Rights:

“This important rule could not come at a more critical time. LGBTQ+ students across the country are under attack and more vulnerable than ever. Hostile states and local school committees have wrongly cut back important school protections that queer and transgender young people need to thrive.  GLAD and our partner organizations look forward to working with schools and school districts to ensure that local policies and practices comply with federal law.”

News

GLAD awarded $1 Million gift from MacKenzie Scott’s Yield Giving open call 

We are thrilled to announce that GLAD is the recipient of a $1 million grant from Yield Giving, the philanthropic fund established by MacKenzie Scott.  

Over 6,000 organizations from across the U.S. applied as part of this year’s open call from Yield Giving – GLAD was one of 361 grantees. Several of our partners in the LGTBQ+ and legal advocacy movements are on the grantee list, including the ACLU of Alabama, Immigration Equality, OutFront Minnesota, Lawyers for Civil Rights, and Gender Justice. Congratulations to all grantees! 

This gift demonstrates an understanding within the broader community of this pivotal moment in the movement for LGBTQ+ rights and equality, as well as confidence in the ability of GLAD to address it through litigation, public policy advocacy, and public education.  

The grant is particularly meaningful as we undertake the search for GLAD’s new Executive Director, who will guide our next phase in the enduring fight for justice for the LGBTQ+ community and people with HIV.

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