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Criminal Justice | Resources for Incarcerated People | Massachusetts

Steps to Take If You Are Being Harassed in Prison

Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 124, Section 1, requires the Commissioner of Corrections to investigate claims of misconduct in jails and prisons.


If you feel that you are being harassed, by either your fellow inmates or by prison officials, you may file grievance. A grievance is a complaint about your conditions or treatment (see sample grievance attached).


The Department of Corrections non-discrimination policy does not include sexual orientation, but Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 127, Section 32 requires that all prisoners be treated “equally and with kindness.”


Prison regulations are found in the Code of Massachusetts Regulations (CMR). As a prisoner, you must be allowed to see the CMR if you ask for it.


103 CMR 934 covers your legal rights. Some of the things you should know are:

  • There must be a written policy explaining your right to speak with a lawyer.
  • There must be a written policy explaining your right to seek help from the Court or government officials.
  • There must be a program to help you prepare and file legal papers. This help can either be a law library and supplies to fill out legal papers, or a program that lets you meet with a lawyer to discuss your problem.
  • There must be a grievance policy to allow you to make complaints and get those complaints heard and solved.
  • You CANNOT be punished for filing a complaint or grievance.

Prison Visitation Rights

The Code of Massachusetts Regulations (CMR) covers prison visitation policy.
If you are incarcerated in a state facility, 103 CMR 483.16 applies.
If you are in a county facility, 103 CMR 950.05 applies.
These regulations must be made available to you if you ask to see them.

The rules do not limit who may visit, but they do allow prison officials broad discretion to end or forbid visits. The rule states that “visitors shall conduct themselves reasonably and not engage in physical contact with inmates that is excessive or inappropriate for a public place.” (103 CMR 483.15). A homophobic prison official could try to use this rule to prevent a prisoner’s same-sex lover from visiting.

If someone visits you (partner, lover, friend) and, after some physical contact (a kiss, hug), his/her visitation rights are suspended or ended completely, you and your visitor do have a right to attempt to get visitation rights restored.


The VISITOR:

  • Must be given a reason for the suspension or ban on visiting, in most cases.
  • Must be told by the prison superintendent, within a week, if and when s/he may start visiting again, or whether there will be restrictions on visiting.
  • May, within fifteen working days, seek a review of the visiting restrictions and get a hearing with the Superintendent.
  • Must get a copy of the prison superintendent’s decision.
  • May file a grievance. A grievance is a complaint about your conditions or treatment (see sample grievance attached).


The VISITOR:

  • Must get a copy of the prison superintendent’s decision.
  • May file a grievance. A grievance is a complaint about your conditions or treatment (see sample
    grievance attached).

The Department of Corrections non-discrimination policy does not include sexual orientation, but Massachusetts
General Law, Chapter 127, Section 32 requires that all prisoners be treated “equally and with kindness.”

Prison regulations are found in the Code of Massachusetts Regulations (CMR). As a prisoner, you must be
allowed to see the CMR if you ask for it.

103 CMR 934 covers your legal rights. Some of the things you should know are:

  • There must be a written policy explaining your right to speak with a lawyer.
  • There must be a written policy explaining your right to seek help from the Court or government officials.
  • There must be a program to help you prepare and file legal papers. This help can either be a law library
    and supplies to fill out legal papers, or a program that lets you meet with a lawyer to discuss your
    problem.
  • There must be a grievance policy to allow you to make complaints and get those complaints heard and
    solved.
  • You CANNOT be punished for filing a complaint or grievance.

Sample Grievance

I, John/Jane Inmate, was harassed/threatened/physically attacked because of my sexual orientation by [name(s) of person(s) involved] on [date(s) that the act(s) took place].

When you write a grievance, be sure to include as much information as you can remember. Include in your complaint:

  • what happened
  • when it happened
  • who did it
  • where it happened
  • what was said by the attacker(s)—paraphrase if you do not remember the exact quote.
  • who saw it happen
  • why you think it happened

If you reported harassment to any prison official(s) previously, indicate who you told, when, and what they did or did not do about it.

GLAD’s 2024 Summer Party

Join GLAD’s 43rd Annual Summer Party!

GLAD is returning to Provincetown for the social event of the season!

Saturday, July 27 2024  |  4:00 – 7:00 pm
Provincetown, MA

Join us for a delicious taste of summer, a gorgeous view, and an opportunity to support GLAD’s transformative mission. We’ll celebrate recent victories, talk about the work ahead, and give you a chance to win big in our incredible auctions! 

Closed caption services provided. ASL interpretation available upon request. Venue is mobility accessible.
Exact location is shared upon registration.

Become an Individual Sponsor

(You can also find this information here)

To join our fabulous Host Committee or become a sponsor and help make this event a success, contact our Assistant Director of Development, Josh Arsenault, at jarsenault@glad.org.

Become a Corporate Sponsor

(You can also find this information here)

For Corporate Sponsorship, contact Aria Pierce, Senior Manager of Institutional Giving, at apierce@glad.org

Check out last year’s event here!

Updated February 6, 2024

25th Annual Spirit of Justice Award Dinner

25th Annual Spirit of Justice Award Dinner

Save The Date!

Friday, October 25  |  Downtown Boston, MA
Cocktail Reception at 6pm  |  Dinner & Speaking Program at 7pm  |  Dessert & Drinks at 9pm

GLAD’s 25th Annual Spirit of Justice Award Dinner is back to dazzle, inspire, and connect our community. The unforgettable gala unites supporters of LGBTQ+ equality for an opportunity to find power in resistance; work toward a future of justice, love, and inclusion; and support GLAD’s life-changing mission.

Closed caption services provided. ASL interpretation available upon request. Venue is mobility accessible.
Exact location is shared upon registration.

Become an Individual Sponsor

(You can also find this information here)

To join our fabulous Host Committee or become a sponsor and help make this event a success, contact our Assistant Director of Development, Josh Arsenault, at jarsenault@glad.org.

Become a Corporate Sponsor

(You can also find this information here)

For Corporate Sponsorship, contact Aria Pierce, Senior Manager of Institutional Giving, at apierce@glad.org

Check out the fabulous photos and videos from last year’s event!

Four people in formalwear and a drag queen from the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence at GLAD's Spirit of Justice event.
GLAD's Mary Bonauto giving remarks on stage at the Spirit of Justice Award Dinner.
Four guests smiling at the Spirit of Justice Award Dinner.

Updated February 7, 2024

News

GLAD mourns the passing of Larry Kessler, a national leader and community organizer from Boston who helped spearhead Massachusetts and the nation’s response to the AIDS pandemic. 

Larry co-founded AIDS Action Committee (AAC) of Massachusetts in 1983 and led the organization as Executive Director until 2003. He played a leading role in advocating at the state, local, and federal levels for fair and effective AIDS policy and funding.

GLAD, including Senior Director of Litigation and HIV Law Bennett Klein worked closely with Larry while he was at the AAC in the early years of the epidemic. We cherish our memories of keeping community with him at the AIDS Walk, as well as partnering with him and Belynda Dunn, another AIDS justice trailblazer, in the work to ensure access to organ transplants for people living with HIV/AIDS.

Our thoughts are with his husband, friends, and the tremendous activist network he leaves behind. 

L.M. v. Town of Middleborough

GLAD and the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents submitted a friend of the court brief at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Support of a Middleborough public school.

Blog

We can do the impossible. We already have.

By Mary L. Bonauto, Senior Director of Civil Rights and Legal Strategies

Twenty years ago today, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court issued its watershed decision in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, making Massachusetts the first U.S. state where same-sex couples could legally marry.

That breakthrough ruling spread joy across the state and the country and turbocharged the movement for the legal recognition of LGBTQ+ relationships, ultimately leading to the 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision requiring all 50 states to perform and recognize marriages of same-sex couples.

While it’s tempting to look back 20 years and think it was always inevitable, it’s important, especially at the challenging moment we are in, to remember that this is the anniversary of a freedom that once seemed impossible.

It took brave people challenging injustice. The seven Goodridge plaintiff couples not only challenged the law but told the stories of their relationships, their love of one another, and their desire to protect their families to the world. In the process, they, and many others with them, shared, listened, answered questions, and helped build greater understanding and inclusion of LGBTQ+ people.

It took all of us – community members, attorneys, organizers, and allies, to get us to that moment.

Often, what separates the possible and impossible is a plan.

Goodridge wasn’t the first marriage case, nor was it the end of the story.

We supported the Hawaii marriage litigation, and then our own plan began in Vermont. With co-counsel Beth Robinson and Susan Murray, we filed a marriage case, Baker v. State of Vermont, that resulted in the nation’s first ever civil union status.

We translated lessons from Vermont to reach a historic breakthrough and win the first legal marriages in the U.S. in Massachusetts.

This turning point triggered national blowback – from the President, the Congress, then Massachusetts Governor Romney, and legislative attempts to reverse the decision via constitutional amendment. Instead of getting beaten back, we built the foundation of a national movement. And we kept going.

15 years ago, Connecticut’s Supreme Court ruled for us in a 2008 marriage case co-counseled with Ken Bartschi, Karen Dowd, and Maureen Murphy, and supported the whole way by Love Makes A Family. Ben Klein’s argument for the couples led to a breakthrough ruling on the impermissibility of discrimination against LGBTQ+ people.

With longstanding state partners, GLAD worked a plan to win marriage across the New England states. Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine passed the nation’s first marriage laws in 2009, and Maine won the first ballot measure in 2012. Rhode Island’s law made it a wrap in 2013. Passing laws and ballot measures showed what the right wing feared: that people would come to see that more marriages meant more security and happiness for more families.

We took the fight national in 2009, challenging the discriminatory Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) on behalf of married couples in Massachusetts whose marriages were disregarded for social security and all federal benefits and responsibilities. We won the first rulings at the federal District and Court of Appeals levels with co-counsel from Jenner & Block, Foley Hoag, and Sullivan & Worcester. We won our second case in Connecticut, too, with couples from Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire. These challenges and the ultimate victory against DOMA which built upon them – U.S. v. Windsor, with counsel Roberta Kaplan in the lead – set the stage for the Supreme Court marriage equality ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges.

Mary Bonauto and Chief Justice Margaret Marshall

Alongside movement partners and courageous plaintiffs, we supported cases nationwide seeking marriage equality. We were asked to join Michigan lawyers representing April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse. By 2015, we were Supreme Court bound to argue for the equal right to marry nationwide.

Getting to a win in Obergefell was a colossal effort of LGBTQ+ legal groups, friends of the court and their attorneys, and so many others. Twenty years after Goodridge, what seemed impossible is the law of the land.

Now, we must do the same thing again.

To be sure, we’ve made tremendous progress for our community.

And yet, we are facing some of the fiercest anti-LGBTQ+ attacks of our lifetimes.

Some people are newly confused and have questions about our community. Consider engaging in a way that invites more conversation and not less.

To be clear, there is also a separate, enormous, coordinated effort to reverse all of the gains we’ve made since the last century on gender and sexual equality.

Our entire community faces revitalized prejudice. The tip of the spear is directed at transgender people and, outrageously, at transgender young people.

In really hard times, when the challenges feel insurmountable, it’s important to understand some of our history. There were losses on the path to victories. And those victories were never inevitable.

What helped bring about transformative change was the strength we drew from one another and growing a movement. Plus, we never quit.

At one time during the marriage equality work, 40 states had either laws, constitutional amendments, or both, that said our relationships were unworthy of recognition. In 1986, the Supreme Court upheld sodomy laws that, in some cases, subjected people to 20-year prison terms for having sex. Yet, against all odds, we overturned those laws, and we will overturn these latest anti-LGBTQ+ laws.

We will always find a path forward.

What matters is all of us, staying engaged, staying positive, and standing up for our commitment to a future of full inclusion, equality, and freedom in which people and communities thrive.

As we joyfully celebrate 20 years of marriage equality, we know we have many miles yet to go to reach that future. But as we travel, let us remember how far we’ve come as fuel for the journey. What seems impossible can be done.

And together, we will do the impossible again.


Find inspiring remarks from the Goodridge plaintiffs, Dee Deidre Farmer, and more at the GLAD’s 2023 Spirit of Justice Award Dinner.

More media about the 20th anniversary of the Goodridge decision:

News

Parents, Advocates, and Lawmakers Testify in Support of Strengthening Legal Protections for Children and Families

Massachusetts Parentage Act Coalition Members inside the MA statehouse
Members of the Massachusetts Parentage Act Coalition at the Judiciary Committee Hearing on November 14, 2023

Families, legal advocates, lawmakers, and others testified in front of the Joint Committee on the Judiciary on Tuesday in support of the Massachusetts Parentage Act (MPA) (S.947/H.1713). The law would increase security for Massachusetts families by ensuring all children, including those born through assisted reproduction, surrogacy, or children born to non-marital or LGBTQ+ parents, have access to parentage, the legal status of the parent-child relationship, and the critical protections necessary for families to thrive.

“Massachusetts has fallen behind the rest of the country in ensuring parental laws reflect and include the diversity of modern-day families, including our LGBTQ+ families, and advances in science,” said Massachusetts Attorney General Andrea Joy Campbell. “This legislation would put us back on track by codifying legal protections for parents, regardless of their marital status, gender, or sexual orientation, or how their child was conceived. I strongly support the Massachusetts Parentage Act which will strengthen families, provide stability for our children, and advance reproductive and LGBTQ+ rights across the state.”

The bill has bipartisan support in the House and the Senate.

“Outdated parentage laws have deprived many children across Massachusetts of the security other families take for granted,” said State Representative Sarah Peake (D-Provincetown). “By treating some children as lesser and unequal — namely children born through assisted reproduction, children born through surrogacy, children born to non-marital parents, and children born to LGBTQ parents — our state leaves children vulnerable and undermines their well-being. The time has come to update our laws and provide all families with the legal protections they deserve.”

“This legislation is important to many children and families in the Commonwealth, including mine,” said State Representative Hannah Kane (R-Shrewsbury). “One of my children identifies as a member of the LGBTQ community, and as she makes her way in life, I want to know that she will be able to build her family and raise her children in a state where they are protected, equally, from day one.”

Massachusetts is the only state in New England with outdated parentage laws. Parentage is the legal status of the parent-child relationship which provides legal protections, such as custody and decision-making, and responsibilities, such as child support and health insurance.

“This bill is personal — LGBTQ+ families like mine face excessive and expensive hoops just to ensure our children have the security of legal parentage,” said State Senator Julian Cyr (D-Truro). “Massachusetts has long been a leader in LGBTQ+ equity, yet we have been resting on our laurels when it comes to parentage. With unprecedented and alarming action in other states to strip away the rights of LGBTQ+ people and our families, the Commonwealth’s outdated and heterocentric parentage laws put LGBTQ+ families at risk every day. The Massachusetts Parentage Act is urgently needed so that all children can benefit from the stability of a legal parent-child relationship no matter how they came to be in this world.”

“No child in Massachusetts should be subjected to the uncertainty and hardship caused by the absence of clearly written laws and the inconsistency of court decisions in that absence,” said State Senator Bruce Tarr (R-Gloucester). “Passing the Massachusetts Parentage Act will create clear legal pathways to establish parentage in an efficient and predictable manner that will benefit children and families.”

The MPA would ensure parents in Massachusetts have the ability to provide health insurance, make medical decisions – including in an emergency – make school decisions, as well as decisions about custody and parenting time, inheritance, and designating their children as beneficiaries of social security benefits.

Twenty years after Massachusetts became the first state to ensure LGBTQ+ equality in marriage, the Commonwealth’s outdated laws still leave children of LGBTQ+ parents vulnerable.

“The security of legal parentage is critical for children’s wellbeing, yet Massachusetts currently operates an unconstitutional system that renders some children and families second-class outsiders,” said Patience Crozier, Director of Family Advocacy for GLAD. “For far too many families their only recourse is for parents to adopt their own children – a burdensome, slow, expensive, and humiliating process that isn’t even accessible to all who need it. Without this law, children – particularly those of LGBTQ families – will remain vulnerable outsiders.”

“The world my children, 2 and 5 at the time, and I knew came crashing down when Massachusetts’ outdated parentage laws said I was not their parent,” said parent Karen Partanen. “They couldn’t understand why Mommy wasn’t there anymore. I spent three years and all my savings fighting to secure their equal rights through the courts. While I was eventually successful, seven years later, other children are still in limbo as other parents navigate years of family court, just to secure rights for their children that should be clear under our laws.”

Learn more about the MPA and how to get involved: MassParentage.org

Watch the hearing:

YouTube video

News

Celebrating Two Decades of Marriage Equality on the Anniversary of the Landmark Goodridge v. Department of Public Health Ruling

To mark the 20th anniversary of the culture-shifting Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruling, GLAD will present the Goodridge plaintiffs with the 2023 Spirit of Justice Award

Twenty years ago, on Nov. 18, 2003, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) issued its watershed decision in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health, making Massachusetts the first U.S. state where same-sex couples could legally marry. 

“The Massachusetts Constitution affirms the dignity and equality of all Individuals,” Chief Justice Margaret H. Marshall wrote in her powerful majority ruling, which continues to be included in wedding celebrations. “It forbids the creation of second-class citizens.”

GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) will celebrate this historic anniversary by presenting the Spirit of Justice Award to the 14 Goodridge plaintiffs: Gloria Bailey-Davies, Linda Bailey-Davies, Edward Balmelli, Maureen Brodoff, Gary Chalmers, Rob Compton, Hillary Goodridge, Julie Goodridge, Michael Horgan, Richard Linnell, Gina Nortonsmith, Heidi Nortonsmith, Ellen Wade, and David Wilson. The awards will be presented at the 24th Annual Spirit of Justice Award Dinner on November 9th in Boston.

GLAD filed Goodridge in April 2001 on behalf of the plaintiffs, who comprised seven couples who sought marriage licenses to achieve legal respect and protection for their relationships butwere denied because they were same-sex couples. Over the course of the litigation, the plaintiffs opened aspects of their lives to the courts, the press, and the public, and by doing so, the public saw their love and commitment for each other and their families, and their vulnerabilities as partners and parents because they could not marry. Following the SJC decision in November 2003 they, along with countless Massachusetts residents, looked forward to May 17 when marriages would begin, despite legal and political efforts to stop the first legal marriages from taking place. Thousands of people then advocated with legislators and policymakers over the next four years to defeat efforts to amend the state constitution, finally ensuring in June 2007 that the Goodridge ruling and the freedom to marry would remain the law in Massachusetts. 

The Goodridge plaintiffs advanced LGBTQ+ equality in Massachusetts and beyond, creating hope and inspiring activism nationwide. They helped to pave the way for additional marriage wins in states, the overturning of the federal Defense of Marriage Act in the U.S. Supreme Court, and, just twelve years later, the 2015 nationwide ruling for marriage equality at the U.S. Supreme Court in Obergefell v. Hodges.

“When the SJC decided Goodridge, it forever changed the standards for how LGBTQ+ people must be treated under law and raised the bar for equality across the country. This momentous victory would not have happened without the courage, commitment, and perseverance of the fourteen Goodridge plaintiffs,” said GLAD Senior Director of Civil Rights and Legal Strategies Mary L. Bonauto, who was lead counsel in Goodridge and argued before the Supreme Court in Obergefell. “Their willingness to repeatedly open themselves to public scrutiny, to share the truth of their lives with their neighbors, and to face opposition from powerful leaders and institutions, ushered in legal and cultural shifts toward greater acceptance, protection, and integration of LGBTQ+ people and families in our communities. We remain grateful for the powerful and empowering efforts of the Goodridge plaintiffs in making marriage equality a reality in Massachusetts and beyond.”

“I wanted our kids to have the same safety and security in their family as other kids, and I believed that the constitution included us and that I could be part of making that movement toward our inclusion happen,” said Gina Nortonsmith of her and her spouse Heidi’s participation in the Goodridge case. “I’m proud that our sons live in a world where they know their parents stood up for the right of people to love whomever they love.”

“We felt incredibly honored to be able to represent one family’s journey in this cause, and to hear so many stories from people of how this decision touched their lives,” added Heidi Nortonsmith. “To be associated with love and equality—that’s a blessing for sure.”

Previous Spirit of Justice honorees include Nadine Smith, Kylar Broadus, Grace Sterling Stowell, Chai Feldblum, Jose Antonio Vargas, the Honorable Eric H. Holder Jr, Phill Wilson, Jennifer Finney Boylan, Urvashi Vaid, Margaret H. Marshall, Deval Patrick and his family; Reverend Irene Monroe; Bishop Gene Robinson; Beth Robinson, John Ward, Terrence McNally, Mandy Carter; Reverend William Sinkford, Tim Gill, Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, Tony Kushner, Laurence Tribe, and Mary L. Bonauto.

Learn more about the Spirit of Justice Award Dinner on November 9, 2023.

Expanding Pharmacy Access to PrEP in Massachusetts

PrEP—a simple, safe medication that reduces the risk of HIV by close to 100%—is the most effective tool we have to end the HIV epidemic.

An Act Enabling Pharmacists to Prescribe, Dispense and Administer PrEP (S.2480/H.2225) expands access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by allowing pharmacists to provide a 60-day supply for those facing barriers to care. The bill also requires pharmacists to link customers who receive a limited supply of PrEP to primary care for ongoing medication and monitoring.

In Massachusetts, only about 1/3 of people at high risk of getting HIV currently have access to PrEP, and the racial disparities in access, particularly among Black and Latinx communities, are especially shocking. Nationally, just 13% of eligible Black people currently have access to this effective and potentially life-saving preventative.

By addressing disparities in access to critical HIV services and increasing access to the best tool available for preventing HIV transmission, S.2480/H.2225 significantly advances the Commonwealth’s goal of ending the HIV epidemic.

Sponsors: Senator Julian Cyr and Representative Jack Lewis

Learn more about PrEP

News

GLAD Praises Senate Passage of Bill to Make HIV-Prevention Pill Available at Pharmacies Without a Prescription

Urges House to act quickly to advance the Commonwealth’s goal of ending the HIV epidemic

Today, the Massachusetts Senate took a crucial step toward ending the HIV epidemic by passing “An Act enabling pharmacists to prescribe, dispense and administer PrEP” (S.2480).

“We’re grateful to Senator Cyr and Senate President Spilka for their unwavering commitment to removing barriers to PrEP access,” said Ben Klein, Senior Director of Litigation and HIV Law at GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders (GLAD). “S.2480 is life-saving legislation that opens a new avenue to obtaining PrEP quickly and easily for people who have difficulty accessing health care.”

Sponsored by Sen. Julian Cyr, S.2480 expands access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)—a simple, safe medication that reduces the risk of HIV by close to 100 percent yet remains underutilized—by permitting pharmacists to dispense a 60-day supply without a prescription. The bill also requires pharmacists to link customers who receive a limited supply of PrEP to primary care for ongoing medication and monitoring.

By addressing disparities in access to critical HIV services and increasing access to the best tool available for preventing HIV transmission, S.2480 significantly advances the Commonwealth’s goal of ending the HIV epidemic.

“PrEP is a game-changing tool for ending the HIV epidemic, but it remains extremely underutilized,” added Klein. “In Massachusetts, only about one-third of all those for whom PrEP is indicated are currently using it, and the racial disparities in access, particularly among Black and Latinx communities, are especially shocking. Nationally just 13 percent of eligible Black individuals currently have access to this effective and potentially life-saving preventative. We commend the Senate for today’s vote and look forward to working with Rep. Jack Lewis, sponsor of the House’s version of the bill (H.2225), on moving this legislation on to final passage.”

PrEP access is under attack nationally. S.2480 is one of two bills GLAD is advocating for to increase access to PrEP in Massachusetts. The second, An Act to address barriers to HIV prevention medication” (S.619/H.1085), also sponsored by Senator Cyr and Rep. Lewis, would remove insurance barriers that prevent people from receiving PrEP in a timely and consistent manner. S.619/H.1085 would eliminate onerous prior authorization requirements that delay access and can mean the difference between prevention or transmission of HIV.

“Copays, deductibles and pre-authorization requirements all decrease utilization of PrEP. That means more HIV cases, more significant HIV-related illness and even death, and ever-widening racial health disparities,” Klein said. “We must aggressively use every tool in our arsenal to reduce transmission and PrEP is the most potent tool we have. Access to PrEP is an essential public health measure and we’re grateful to legislative leaders including Senator Cyr and Rep. Lewis who are demonstrating their deep commitment to ending the HIV epidemic in Massachusetts.”

Learn more about the bill

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