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Representing Plaintiff(s) · Pending

Deboer v. Snyder

Update: Oral Argument at the U.S. Supreme Court has been set for April 28, 2015.
 
See the petitioner's briefs and amicus briefs filed in support of the freedom to marry here.
 
The petitioners opening brief was filed February 27, 2015. Read more
 
The Supreme Court Announced January 16 that it will review this case along with related marriage equality cases out of Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee. Read More
 
The DeBoer-Rowse family is represented by Michigan attorneys Carole Stanyar, Dana Nessel of Nessel & Kessel Law, Kenneth Mogill of Mogill, Posner & Cohen, Wayne State University Law Professor Robert Sedler, and by GLAD’s Mary Bonauto. Mary re-joined the DeBoer legal team after helping gather experts for their historic March 2014 trial.
 
Washington Post: Meet the couples who will be part of history in the same-sex marriage battle 
 
USA Today: Michigan couple poised to make gay marriage history
 
Support GLAD's work on this case
 
The DeBoer Rowse Family
April and Jayne with three of their children
 
On November 14 attorneys for Michigan couple April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse filed a petition asking the U.S. Supreme Court to hear their case, seeking to overturn the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision upholding bans on marriage for same-sex couples in Michigan, Kentucky, Ohio, and Tennessee.

April DeBoer and Jayne Rowse are both nurses and are the mothers of four children they fostered and adopted and are fostering a fifth. They are devoted to each other, to their kids, and they should be able to marry.
 
U.S. District Court Judge Bernard Friedman ruled in March 2014 that Michigan’s laws prohibiting same-sex couples from marrying are unconstitutional, following a two-week trial in which expert testimony was heard from the nation’s leading psychologists, sociologists, child welfare professionals, and historians.
 
In a departure from nearly 50 pro-marriage decisions across the U.S. since June 2013, a three-member panel of the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals’ issued its opinion on November 6, 2014 reversing Judge Friedman’s ruling, along with similar rulings from Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee.
 
For more information on the case, visit NationalMarriageChallenge.com